Blue Cruise Yacht Charters

Motor Sailing Gulet
Princess Karia II
Chartering
Turkey And Greece

Gulet Chartering Turkey

This handsome motor-sailing gulet which came down the ways of her Bodrum shipyard in 2008
may be found chartering along the southwest coast of Turkey and among Aegean islands of Greece.

Gulet Chartering Greece

Gulet Chartering Greece And Turkey


Technical Specifications:

Year Built: 2008
L.O.A.: 111 ft
Beam: 24 ft
Draft: 12.4 ft
Full Sail Area: 6,100 sq ft
Engines: (2) 405hp Cummins
Generators: (2) 27kva Onan
Fuel Tanks: 1,320 gal
Maximum Speed: 14 knots
Cruising Speed: 12 knots

Crew:
Captain
Chef
(2) Deckhands
(2) Hostesses

Gulet Chartering Turkey

Equipment:

Marine Air Conditioning
GPS Navigation
Radar
Internet Connection
Plasma Television
DVD Players
Seatel C24 TV Antenna
CD Stereo System
Deep Freeze-Ice Machine
Deck Shower
Kayak
Snorkeling Gear
Fishing Tackle
80hp Ski Boat
Water Skies
Tender w/Outboard

Chartering Greece And Turkey

Accommodations:

Six cabins, two master, two double, and two double with additional single berth,
all air conditioned, each with television and DVD player, and each with its own bathroom.
Air conditioned inner salon with television and bar. Large quarter and sun decks.
Separate crew accommodations.

Gulet Chartering Greece

Gulet Chartering Turkey


Gulet Chartering Greece And Turkey

Gulet Chartering Greece And Turkey

Chartering Greece And Turkey

A Sister Motor-Sailing Gulet Chartering Greece And Turkey

A Smaller Motor-Sailing Gulet Chartering Greece And Turkey

A Motor-Sailing Gulet Queen Chartering Greece And Turkey

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This page last updated 01/01/2016

Dear Homo Sapiens, There is no need to continue reading this page. What follows is intended for search engine robots and spiders and not necessarily for human beings. Further information about gulet chartering in Greece and Turkey may be obtained by clicking on the blue links immediately above. Thank You. Could you be surfing the web in search of a yacht cruising Greece or Turkey? Perhaps for an elegant and stable motor-sailer because you're not a part of the rail-in-the-water crowd, because you have had a very tough year and wish to get away from it all, because you are dreaming of catered relaxation, a lounge chair under a warm sun, a good book in hand, a gin-and-tonic at your elbow? And you believe it's in the Aegean you will find true happiness? Sailing the Aegean? Well, you have probably surfed right to the most appropriate web page on the entire world wide web. You have found Princess Karia II, an elegant motor-sailer with accommodations for twelve in six private guest cabins. With an accomplished chef, as well, and with two hostesses among its crew of six. With exquisitely appointed furnishings set against painstakingly varnished mahogany surrounded by teak decks. Karia, it might be noted, may be spelled either with a Greek kappa (K) or with a Latin cee (C), while the historical confines of the nation-state with that name straddle what is now the southwest corner of Turkey. Facing the Aegean. Could you be dreaming of a motor-sailer chartering Turkey? A motor-sailer which in Turkey is termed a gulet? Or could you be dreaming of a motor-sailing gulet chartering Greece? Or both? The Karian people, it might be further noted, spoke their own language, a language yet to be deciphered with its own alphabet, an alphabet akin to that of Phoenicians and Greeks. But we know Karians had a similar dream about the Aegean, not just because the historical confines of their nation-state bordered the Aegean but also because the Karian civilization ruled the entire Aegean during the two millennia preceding arrival of Phoenicians in the third millennia BCE. We know this because of archaeological excavations on several Aegean islands, and because when the sacred island of Delos in mid-Aegean was purified in the fifth century BCE by clearing the island of its interred, half of all the interred were keeping company with Karian artifacts. As you might imagine, a Karian history of Chartering Greecethousands of years would include a good number of queens and princesses. And so it does, notably the two Queens Artemisia with remarkable records at sea as well as in governance, Phryne who posed for Praxiteles famous nude Aphrodite gracing the temple at Karian Knidos, Aspasia from Miletus, the companion of Pericles called the uncrowned Queen of Athens, and Ada enthroned as Queen of Karia by Alexander in 334 BCE to succeed the satrap appointed by the Great King of Persia. But there was in antiquity yet another woman of consequence, not to mention beauty, who might be considered a princess of Karia. She was wife to a ruler of Karia in 334 BCE and spent several years at both Karian Rhodes and at Halikarnassus (modern Bodrum), the capital city of Karia. What would you think about chartering Greece and Turkey in her wake? At the crossroads of history. Yes, crossroads once patrolled by the triremes of her husbands Mentor and Memnon, and once enjoyed by the lateen-rigged caique of Barsine herself. Barsine was a striking Anatolian beauty with a considerable place in history. Born in 363 BCE at Gordium to the satrap or local King of Phrygia in what is now north-central Turkey but what was then a part of the Persian Great King's empire, she was destined to influence the course of eastern Mediterranean history. Following a failed revolt on the part of her father against the Great King, Barsine's family in 354 BCE found refuge at the Macedonian court of Philip II. Barsine had earlier been married at the age of 8 to Mentor of Rhodes, a naval commander in the pay of her father, and separated from him at the age of 9. Philip's guest for the next twelve years, and a statuesque beauty, she came to know Philip's son Alexander and his tutor Aristotle before rejoining her husband at Rhodes in 342 BCE. Mentor died two years later leaving Barsine a widow at the age of 23. She promptly married Mentor's brother Memnon, also a naval commander formerly in the employ of her father. Memnon had meanwhile succeeded his brother as the Great King's ruler of the Troad (Troy) which then included Pergamum where he had his estates, and he was still ruler when Alexander's Macedonian and Greek army crossed the Hellespont in 334 BCE. Following Alexander's victory over a Persian and Greek army (yes, Greeks fought on both sides) at the Granicus, Memnon was made supreme commander of the Great King's forces in all of Asia Minor and Barsine was sent to his headquarters at Halikarnassus. While Alexander detoured inland to Gordium, some say to cut the Gordian knot, Barsine was further dispatched from Halikarnassus as a hostage to the Great King's court, securing (Greek) Memnon's loyalty. As Memnon was then also commander of the Persian Navy which was Phoenician, Cypriot, and Rhodian Greek in make-up, and as Alexander's admiral Nearchus commanded an inferior Macedonian fleet, Barsine went safely by galley to the Middle East, sailing down the Aegean coast of what is now SW Turkey and then along Turkey's Mediterranean coast eventually reaching Persepolis. Alexander that same year proceeded to take Ephesus and Aspasia's Miletus without a fight but met stiff resistance at Halikarnassus defended by Barsine's Memnon. The outcome was indecisive with Alexander moving on before subduing all of the city, and Memnon later abandoned its defense. Memnon with Chartering Turkey300 galleys then proceeded to take the war to Alexander's rear, investing the island of Chios and then besieging Lesbos where he died of natural causes in 333 BC. Barsine was again left a widow, this time at the age of 30. Isn't this the kind of holiday embellishment for which you are searching? Turkish coast sailing at the crossroads of history. Greek island hopping. A motor-sailing gulet cruising the Aegean from Bodrum. Or from Gocek. Or from Rhodes or Kos. A motor-sailing gulet to cruise the Mediterranean coast of Turkey and among Aegean islands of Greece. The holiday of a lifetime. A holiday at the crossroads of history. At about the time of Memnon's death, Alexander defeated the Great King at the Battle of Issus near modern Iskenderun, Turkey, and, having taken the Great King's entourage captive (depicted at left above), found he was "willing to attach himself to so agreeable and illustrious a woman" (Plutarch's Life Of Alexander) as Barsine. For the next six years Barsine (that's said to be her to the right) was a fixture at Alexander's side, accompanying him in the reduction of modern Iraq and then in the conquest of modern Afghanistan. Between them they knew something which escaped Dick Cheney and George W. Bush. In 327 BC Barsine gave birth to Alexander's first son Herakles, but after Alexander's death in 323 BC returned to Pergamum. There she resided for the next fourteen years until mother and son were assassinated in 309 BCE as threats to the Macedonian throne. The authors can put the work-exhausted aboard a motor-sailing gulet with an experienced crew able to sail among Aegean islands of Greece in style, the Cyclades, the Dodecanese, the Sporades, or they can put charter guests aboard a motor-sailing gulet to cruise Barsine's routes around the Greek island of Rhodes and along the south coast of Turkey to Iskenderun. Princess Karia II, a superb crewed gulet chartering Greece and Turkey and knowledgeable of local history. Contact Blue Cruise Yacht Charters today at bcycharter@aol.com